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Seatan
06-22-2015, 01:36 PM
So I now have baby dreads with human hair extensions and am going through the lovely baby dread process. I kept them up in a cap while I SCUBA'd last week, though they got loose on a night dive and I STUFFED them into the cap, causing them all to tangle at the bottom so badly I had to rip them apart. (And hour of detangling didn't budge them they were so tightly matted, so I now have a "Papa Dread" that has like five tails at the bottom!) I haven't been having major problems with the seams between the real dreads and the extensions, but I will be glad when they mature and become one permanent lock. I am just starting the maturation level where they begin to loop... Anyone else gone through the dreading process? (As opposed to having synthetic dreads--I had synthetics in high school, but those are a breeze to maintain. These suckers are teaching me a new meaning of "patience"! Hopefully it pays out in the end with lovely, ropey dreads.) I would love to hear your dreadhead experiences!

Looking dready in the bathtub:

30790

selkie13
06-22-2015, 02:32 PM
I'm following this forum
Don't have any myself yet but I will at the end of summer :)


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maggie.merpuff
08-13-2015, 08:27 AM
I have 42 twist and rip dreads. I love them so!! They're almost 4 months old, but look further along due to how much time I spend in salt water.


http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/08/13/c01cb46bd399500eba1407d6b75dff90.jpg


.`.`..`.><(((>

leeloo
10-25-2015, 01:41 AM
How do dread extensions work? I recently bought hair falls from Diva Dreads but would love permanent dreads. I want long hair though and feel like my current hair will be too short and possibly too thin for my liking once dreaded

AniaR
10-25-2015, 02:18 AM
I always liked the idea of dreads but then I read some pretty convincing arguments about how it is hurtful cultural appropriation so I just sorta let that idea go.

SeaGlass Siren
10-25-2015, 10:04 AM
The whole process sounds..
dreadful!


;)

RomanLaveau
10-25-2015, 12:40 PM
Well something I know about! Well first you should call them locks because the term dreads stemmed from what Seaglass said the process to be, "dreadful". And since you have different hair the way of locking is slightly different so the process isn't that terrible from how people with more ethnic hair do theirs. But yes it definitely is a patience tester
As far as Raina and the hurtful cultural appropriation, a lot of people do it for fashion whether black, white or any other race, however a lot of people do it for the journey of that person and their crown (that's what we call our locks). It's a style that's grows as you do, personally being Jamaican, if locks make you happy then by all means do it, I love the look on all types of people.
Leeloo it'd be easier to watch YouTube videos on it because it's nicer to see it and harder to explain

Shaylee Moon
10-25-2015, 08:15 PM
I've wanted some my whole life but I cant seem to get them to work in my natural hair however I did just order some synthetic ones a while back they should be arriving in the beginning of nov


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Mermaid Jaffa
10-26-2015, 04:03 AM
I don't know how you mers with long hair and dread locks can pull it off... I can't stand it when MY hair hits my shoulders... Must. Have. Haircut.

RomanLaveau
10-28-2015, 02:18 AM
I don't know how you mers with long hair and dread locks can pull it off... I can't stand it when MY hair hits my shoulders... Must. Have. Haircut.
Lmao I love my hair getting longer!!! Just. Keep. Growing

SeaGlass Siren
10-28-2015, 09:45 AM
Well something I know about! Well first you should call them locks because the term dreads stemmed from what Seaglass said the process to be, "dreadful". And since you have different hair the way of locking is slightly different so the process isn't that terrible from how people with more ethnic hair do theirs. But yes it definitely is a patience tester
As far as Raina and the hurtful cultural appropriation, a lot of people do it for fashion whether black, white or any other race, however a lot of people do it for the journey of that person and their crown (that's what we call our locks). It's a style that's grows as you do, personally being Jamaican, if locks make you happy then by all means do it, I love the look on all types of people.
Leeloo it'd be easier to watch YouTube videos on it because it's nicer to see it and harder to explain

I feel enlightened.

Vrindavana Starfish
10-28-2015, 01:50 PM
I always liked the idea of dreads but then I read some pretty convincing arguments about how it is hurtful cultural appropriation so I just sorta let that idea go.


Well something I know about! Well first you should call them locks because the term dreads stemmed from what Seaglass said the process to be, "dreadful". And since you have different hair the way of locking is slightly different so the process isn't that terrible from how people with more ethnic hair do theirs. But yes it definitely is a patience tester
As far as Raina and the hurtful cultural appropriation, a lot of people do it for fashion whether black, white or any other race, however a lot of people do it for the journey of that person and their crown (that's what we call our locks). It's a style that's grows as you do, personally being Jamaican, if locks make you happy then by all means do it, I love the look on all types of people.
Leeloo it'd be easier to watch YouTube videos on it because it's nicer to see it and harder to explain

Also, locks have been worn by monks, rishis, and spiritual practitioners (men and women) of all races for millennia. Today, it's commonly believed to be a black culture hairstyle, but that's not entirely true. Locks have historically been worn as a sign of renunciation, and as a symbol of a quest for higher awareness.

Shaylee Moon
10-28-2015, 02:32 PM
Also, locks have been worn by monks, rishis, and spiritual practitioners (men and women) of all races for millennia. Today, it's commonly believed to be a black culture hairstyle, but that's not entirely true. Locks have historically been worn as a sign of renunciation, and as a symbol of a quest for higher awareness.

I saw someone once say they were getting rid of theirs because it was a disrespect to black people to wear them and she had no bussiness in that and then they totally ignored my opinion on why its not just a black people thing and that its silly to only let black people wear a certain hairstyle. I just dont get how using a hairstyle can be racist unless its to make fun of a certain race and if you truly enjoy your locks then how is that being racist?


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SeaGlass Siren
10-28-2015, 02:55 PM
there is a fine line between cultural appropriation, and appreciation. it gets confusing.

Vrindavana Starfish
10-28-2015, 03:47 PM
there is a fine line between cultural appropriation, and appreciation. it gets confusing.

This is true. I'm a white girl with a Sanskrit name who wears saris. If someone who didn't know a thing about me were to see me in a sari, they might assume I was being culturally appropriative. They might not realize that I was wearing a sari because I'm on my way to the temple, and this is the appropriate way for me to dress. They might not realize that although Indian customs are not a part of my genetic culture, I live according to Vedic scriptures, and Vedic customs are very prevalent in Indian culture (so much so that many think they're the same thing - they're not) and that it is a part of my religious culture.

Cultural appropriation is taking something from one culture, not caring about its meaning whatsoever, and using it for yourself outside of it's original meaning and context, usually just because you think it looks cool. It's everywhere. If you take an image that is sacred to one group, slap it on the butt of some jeans and call it "fashion," where you're literally sitting on the face of someone else's deity, that's appropriation. It's totally disrespectful.

If you think that image is beautiful and something about it makes you feel connected, and you have it hanging on your wall, maybe you learn about it some more, that is appreciation.
If you have adopted a lifestyle or customs/spiritual beliefs outside of your genetic heritage, and it is legitimately part of your life, then it is also part of your culture now. Not your genetic heritage, but your personal culture. People who move to other countries adopt the new country's culture all the time, and can still maintain pride in their heritage, or even blend elements of both. That is not appropriation.

If someone decides to get locks because they smoke pot and think it looks cool, and they try to speak like a Jamaican, but they've never been to Jamaica, don't care about Rastafarianism and don't know what it's about, and their "culture" is to take elements to justify just being a pothead or to get attention, then I can see why people would get upset.

As for dreadlocks, there are many reasons for wearing them across many, many cultures. Check out the wikipedia history of locks (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreadlocks). Also, it should be noted that some people will always find a way to be offended or insulted. If locks mean something to you, and are part of a lifestyle and bigger picture for you, then wear them.

Shaylee Moon
10-28-2015, 05:49 PM
I personally love locks, always have and probably always will, They are part of my view of how I feel inside but I have to use synthetics because my hair is too short and to bleh for real ones. I dont know. I dont really consider it appropriation but really I come from a place where race is super mixed so I was raised thinking everything is for everyone. In all reality I've never seen a person of color be offended about stuff like this, only white people saying its offensinve and people shouldnt do it.


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Vrindavana Starfish
10-28-2015, 05:54 PM
I personally love locks, always have and probably always will, They are part of my view of how I feel inside but I have to use synthetics because my hair is too short and to bleh for real ones. I dont know. I dont really consider it appropriation but really I come from a place where race is super mixed so I was raised thinking everything is for everyone. In all reality I've never seen a person of color be offended about stuff like this, only white people saying its offensinve and people shouldnt do it.


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Yeah I've had the exact same experience. I've never had an Indian person get at all upset. In fact, they're usually psyched to see me dress in Indian clothing, but I've had several white people, family included, get furious with me.

Mermaid Wesley
10-28-2015, 06:19 PM
I've seen black people say not to, so I won't. I mean it's just a hairstyle and I don't mind. I saw a cool info graphic on it once but I don't have it anymore.

If I find it I'll share.


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Shaylee Moon
10-28-2015, 07:04 PM
Just seems silly to have something be exclusively for one race to use


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SeaGlass Siren
10-28-2015, 07:34 PM
I had a black friend of mine asking if t was ok for her school group (predominantly white cis male) to use Asian dragon motif and use Chinese patterns. She wasn't sure if it's cultural appropriation.
i flat out told her personally I wouldn't be offended if she used it because she asked and she was genuinely concerned and that, for there to be cultural appropriation, she would've had to discriminate Asian people and then use it for no other reason than to say it was cool. But I wasn't ok with the white guys using and borrowing things from my background just because they thought it was cool. (Small backstory they're racist AF and they told her she was thinking too much)

saborigakusei
10-28-2015, 09:49 PM
The best argument I've heard as to why white people having dreadlocks is offensive is because it's an example of white privilege. More often than not people of color with locks get automatically judged in a negative light. That can mean getting avoided and treated suspiciously in public, getting turned down for a job for not looking 'professional' enough, or worse. When white people wear dreads they're usually just seen as different, or hippies or what have you. It's not always a positive image for white people either but it doesn't have remotely the same impact.

I may not have worded this in the best way, and I by no means consider myself knowledgeable enough on the topic to have an informed opinion. But this is what I've heard and it didn't seem to have been mentioned yet. :)

Mermaid Kelda
10-28-2015, 10:20 PM
Yeah, I mean in theory there isn't anything wrong with sharing things across cultures, but when black people get vilified for something that's part of their culture and then white people take that same thing and make it "edgy" and "fashionable" then that's problematic.

For example, in my school and in many others, afros and locs were considered "inappropriate hairstyles". Sure, white kids weren't allowed to have afros or locs, same as black kids, but that wasn't an inconvenience for them because their natural hair is not an afro or locs. Black kids had to alter their natural appearance to fit in with what white culture deemed "appropriate". So I can understand when a POC looks at white celebrities etc wearing locs as a fashion statement to be cool and edgy, and see that as insensitive because they've been vilified for that their entire life.

Vrindavana Starfish
10-29-2015, 01:19 AM
True to both of the above posts. The worst part is, that white privilege goes so far beyond hairstyles. If you're not white, you're already going to have to fight harder. Not cool.

Mermaid Momo
10-29-2015, 02:13 AM
*wipes tears from eyes* I'm so proud I'm not the first to bring up why dreads on white people is wrong. I feel like a proud momma bird lol.

But to answer questions about how other races wear dreads: the simple answer is no, they did not. Other cultures and races wore hair MATS which is not what dreads are, dreads are a style created specifically for afro textured hair, if black people didn't comb, pick out, etc our hair, they will form dreads naturally, which is hair twisted around itself and NOT matted while if other races don't comb their hair what will happen? matts.

Another example of why dreads shouldn't be worn by other people who aren't black is because of the way black people are stigmatised for wearing our OWN hair styles, the way we've cared for our hair for generations. Just recently a school banned afro puffs and twists! another school banned afros! another banned dreadlocks and cornrows. Black people can be called "ghetto" and "unprofessional" when wearing these styles while when other races do it it's "hip, cool, earthy, urban, a cool new trend" A cool video about this is "Don't cash crop my cornrows" (below)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1KJRRSB_XA

another article that explains it very well: http://everydayfeminism.com/2015/07/white-people-black-hairstyles/

TLDR: don't do it, black people can loose jobs, be kicked out of school, for wearing our hair the way it grows out of our heads while white people and other non black poc are praised for being "unique" when they wear those same styles.

Mermaid Wesley
10-29-2015, 06:25 AM
The spam bots are getting intelligent now o_0 I'll delete it.


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MerEmma
10-29-2015, 12:29 PM
Thank you for sharing that video, Momo. I really appreciated the way that she presented the info in that video. Amandla has grown up so much since Hunger Games, too!

On a somewhat related note, I've also enjoyed this bit from The Office (US) with Darryl:

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mcwicknXXw1qzspul.gif

Vrindavana Starfish
10-29-2015, 02:01 PM
Thanks Momo! I'm better informed now! :)

Shaylee Moon
10-29-2015, 03:08 PM
But if it werent seen as negative it would be okay? Idk. Im not exactly white either but either way I still think that excluding a hairstyle to one race is not a good way to combat its negative connotation. But again over here every race is mixed and shared snd cultural apropristion wasnt even a thing until I went to an american school


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Mermaid Momo
10-29-2015, 03:16 PM
Sometimes you just have to realize that some things aren't meant for you to partake in because of it's significance to that culture and just to accept that and let it be. Black hair has a very long history of both opression and movements in which black people and people with afro textured hair has tried to take the stigma away from black hair (but seeing how in 2015, I was still asked to get rid of my braids for a job, then asked to "comb" my fro, aka, do something to it besides let it be an afro, it obviously has a long way to go in the acceptance of black hair.)

Shaylee Moon
10-29-2015, 03:28 PM
Well yeah and thats obviously wrong that people do that but limiting the look to one race only stigmatizes the look to some extent. If everyone were to accept the look as just another hairstyle that some people like and some people dont then it should be okay for those who love them to be able to sport them.


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Aisling
10-29-2015, 04:37 PM
I don't really have any stake in this topic. I did, however, watch a youtube video on cultural appropriation and the other side of this argument.
I'm going to post it, not because I feel one way or the other, but because I think it might be relevant for people to form their own opinions, and provide to this conversation.
*Warning: Language


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGgj9S8XO7k

SeaGlass Siren
10-29-2015, 05:15 PM
Sometimes you just have to realize that some things aren't meant for you to partake in because of it's significance to that culture and just to accept that and let it be. Black hair has a very long history of both opression and movements in which black people and people with afro textured hair has tried to take the stigma away from black hair (but seeing how in 2015, I was still asked to get rid of my braids for a job, then asked to "comb" my fro, aka, do something to it besides let it be an afro, it obviously has a long way to go in the acceptance of black hair.)

ew. I'm sorry that happened to you.

Vrindavana Starfish
10-29-2015, 08:38 PM
That video was great, Aysel, and I have to admit that I pretty much agree with this guy.

However, I do want to be sensitive to the b*llsh*t that Mermaid Momo has had to deal with because of her hair. That's just fraking wrong, and I'm sorry that's happened to you. It sounds like it's happened over and over, too, which is even worse. That's a problem. I've had my share of bs because of my hair being so long and people not liking that, but 1) I've never been the victim of racism because of it and 2) that makes it a totally different experience. The only reason I bring it up is that if I think about the nasty things people have said about my hair and multiply that x's 100,000 and add in there fear of losing a job because of how my hair naturally looks, maybe I could come close to understanding what it feels like.

I don't want to know what it feels like, and I don't think anyone should ever have to. I think the problem is not white people wearing dreads and it's ok, I think the problem is specifically that black people are treated differently for doing the exact same thing. And that their role in anything is downplayed. That's the problem.

I don't have dreads. I don't have any problem with anyone of any color wearing them if they feel it represents who they are, but that's my opinion. And ultimately, the only person my opinion really matters to is me. I do want to be sensitive and understand why other people would be upset though, and now I have a better understanding and some stuff to think about.

Mermaid Wesley
10-29-2015, 09:22 PM
Oh I remembered the argument that I forgot!
When white people wear dreadlocks, they're dirty hippies (bear with me) when white people get their hair to form dreads they often don't shower, put wax in their hair etc. my uncle had them for a while and never showered, only went surfing, and had crap stuck in his hair all the time. White people wear dreads to be edgy, hippie-esque, to show they smoke pot and are all about free love, etc etc and all that is fine.

BUT when black people wear dreads because, you know, that's how their hair works, they are also labeled as dirty, hippies, edgy, and all the rest.

This means that though the white person with dreads is living their carefree life (and that's cool, I don't judge. ) the black person with dreads is unable to be taken seriously. Especially at job interviews. It's a hairstyle that's viewed as unprofessional and dirty for EVERYONE. But the reason it's viewed that way is because white people wear this hairstyle in that way.

So black people, who would just like to wear their hair in a convenient and natural way, are stigmatized BECAUSE of the actions of white people with dreads.

White people make the effort to have dreads, fully aware of what it will make other people think of them.

Black people have to make an effort to avoid dreads so that they can avoid the stereotype of their natural hair.

Imagine having to curl your hair every morning because having straight hair means you're dirty. Now imagine that the reason people think this is because when the dominant race purposefully makes their hair straight to promote a free-love, (again I don't have a problem with this stuff but lots of employers and authority figures do) no-bra, no shower, wanderlust lifestyle.


I'm on a bit of a rant but when it was explained to me like this I finally got it. I hope I help! And I'm not damning anyone with dreads, sometimes we just don't know how certain things cause problems.

Ok I'm done. Momo, or anyone who knows better than me can certainly correct me too, I'm an undercooked pancake so.


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saborigakusei
10-29-2015, 11:03 PM
I'm actually super happy with this thread because it's gotten me to think about a topic I haven't really spent much time on. So thank you all for just having a wonderful chill discussion and being so open and everything. :3

Just my personal experiences and thoughts...

I work in hospitality, and I'm considering that for a career. I'm also aiming to become a flight attendant sometime in the next few years. And I can't have dreads because of that.

Yes, the times are changing and I'm sure there are some employers who are enlightened and wouldn't care, but the thought of doing a job interview with dreads is actually terrifying for me, because I know I wouldn't get the job. I feel like even if the company/interviewers are okay with dreads, it goes beyond that. Unfortunately both industries have super high grooming and dress standards, because you're the face of their company. And if they think that their customers will find your appearance unsavory, they won't hire you.

I'm only half black and my hair wouldn't dread naturally, but I do love dreads and would probably get them if I didn't think having them would hinder my career. And though it really frustrates me to do so, I do straighten my hair for job opportunities because straight hair "looks more professional" than curly and I feel I have a higher chance of getting the job.

This actually impacts MAJOR aspects of poc's lives. And it seems like the main argument for white people having dreads is freedom of expression, which really can't take priority over people's livelihoods or safety, in my mind at least. And I don't think anyone's saying "white people can't get dreads", just that poc will rightfully get upset at such a blatant flaunt of privilege. Well intended or not.

Also... I feel bad because this thread totally wasn't supposed to be about social justice issues....

I really would love to be a mer with dreads. They look AMAZING underwater and don't become a huge ridiculous tangle like my hair does lol. I was lucky enough to swim with juku a few times and oh my god<333
He has these cute little sea creature charms in his dreads, his hair just looks so awesome in and out of the water... *fangirls a little bit*. :33 Hair goals tho.

Shaylee Moon
10-30-2015, 09:14 AM
Well Im hispanic and a lot of my family is black but Im studying and planning on working in the art industry so appearance has never been an issue although I feel narural hair isnt as stigmatized here in pr, a lot of people here have curly hair but thats just been my experience. I understand why black people would be upset at this flaunt of privilege but Idk I still want to be a mer with dreads really badly


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