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View Full Version : Drowning situations, and mer's with lifesaving ideas...



Mermaid Danielle
07-06-2013, 02:17 PM
I thought I'd post this after reading a facebook post regarding lifesaving while mermaiding. The following is an edited version of my response to the person;

If you are serious about saving someone, you need to take a lifesaving course. Unfortunately, many people die from trying to save others, not for lack of strength or will, but from lack of knowledge of the dangers of the water and the situation. This literally *just* happened in Michigan, Monroe county to be exact. A man died after jumping in Lake Erie to try and save an 8 yr old. The kid was picked up by another boat, but the man has been lost to the lake, and his body has yet to be found. Kudos to you for wanting to help someone, but make sure you are able to keep yourself safe as well. The best way to do so will be to take the course!

http://www.freep.com/article/20130704/NEWS03/307040056/missing-boater-rescue-Estral-Beach-Lake-Erie-Monroe-County

For anyone with ideas of lifesaving while mermaiding (I'll admit, the thought has crossed my mind as well), please educate yourself! Take a lifesaving course and *PLEASE* see to your own safety *first*! You won't be able to help someone if you put yourself in danger, while trying to help them. Minimize the danger to yourself, through education and practice, before helping another, especially in this situation!

Best wishes!

Mermaid Dottie
07-06-2013, 03:25 PM
Actually, I'm already planning on taking a lifeguard certification course. I want to have that on my resume when people ask about my safety and the safety of my swimming companions while in tail.

Mermaid Danielle
07-06-2013, 08:25 PM
Glad to hear Mermaid Dottie! I'm planning on doing the same, after being at the lakes this past weekend. The storms really messed with the water, but there were still many kids playing in the water, just after the storm. It was freaking me out! Hopefully I can find a course to take this summer or fall.

Theobromine
07-06-2013, 09:47 PM
This is really good info to put out there. People who are panicking can actually be quite dangerous to would-be rescuers. I'm not a lifeguard but I'm a certified Rescue Diver so I've learned about emergency situations and dealing with people's stress/panicked reactions. The number one rule is definitely to look out for your own safety first. You're not doing anyone any favors if you get both of you drowned.

Echidna
07-06-2013, 10:24 PM
Why did the man drown?
Was it very stormy? The article doesn't say.

...If it was stormy, why were they out on a boat?

Blondie
07-06-2013, 11:37 PM
This is the first year in three years I'm not lifeguarding.

It is VERY important to look out for your safety before others sometimes. Especially if you're just a good citizen at the beach/lake/pool. Lakes, rivers, and beaches can be VERY dangerous. I've heard a few stories about people reacting heroically and then putting themselves in danger. It's great to be the hero. And good for you that you have the guts to jump in an save someone! But think about your safety first. It's not worth it to put yourself at risk.

Mermaid Danielle
07-10-2013, 08:46 PM
Caltuna, I'm not sure. I don't think it was stormy, but I really don't have any idea. I'm guessing he just got stuck in the current and couldn't get out...

AptaMer
07-11-2013, 12:40 AM
I did my Bronze Cross back in university. One of the first things they taught us was that people who are in trouble in the water can panic, and have been know to grab the lifeguard so tightly, the rescuer can't swim. They taught us to go out with a float, ring, or at least a pole (whatever we had access to, spending on the situation) and extend the float or pole out to them to grab, and only continue to approach them if they would be calm. If they started heaving on the float to try and get to you and grab you, we were taught to back off and tell them they had to calm down before we could rescue them.

Echidna
07-11-2013, 03:27 AM
My father did a lifeguard training during his service time, and the trainees were told to knock out the to-be-rescued-guy if he wasn't calm lol.

Merman Chatfish
11-24-2014, 10:35 PM
I did my Bronze Cross back in university. One of the first things they taught us was that people who are in trouble in the water can panic, and have been know to grab the lifeguard so tightly, the rescuer can't swim. They taught us to go out with a float, ring, or at least a pole (whatever we had access to, spending on the situation) and extend the float or pole out to them to grab, and only continue to approach them if they would be calm. If they started heaving on the float to try and get to you and grab you, we were taught to back off and tell them they had to calm down before we could rescue them.

Yep grabbing the victim is the last resort. If you know Red Cross's Whales Tails, one thing we teach in swim lessons is "reach or throw, don't go." I have a real life video I use for training (and can share on here) where a teen jumps into the pool with some friends and he starts drowning. Two of the friends try to help him and for each of them he starts to drown them...uncontrollably pushing them down to keep himself up.


Why did the man drown?
Was it very stormy? The article doesn't say.

This last July a lifeguard of 15 years lost his life while performing a rescue of a man pulled out too far. They were both hit with a large wave and the guard went under. Took 3 hours to find him.