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Thread: Changing The Militant Image Of Animal Rights Activists

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by AniaR View Post
    There are a few but most have to fly as far as HERE to get help! The higher population places have them, but don't have enough staff. Also when someone gets lost they send search and rescue from Halifax!



    Inuit have 5 times the national average of suicides. edit: most recent stats put it at 13 times! More people are dying by suicide alone than being born.
    That is so sad! What do you think can be done to prevent it?
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  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by Echidna View Post
    ^^
    Unrelated to anything else that has been said;
    people who live on a diet rich with fish, dolphin, whale and other marine mammal are not doing themselves a favour because of the high mercury levels, which leads to many health and mental problems.

    Either way, I regard the Inuit as the people who have gotten the shortest end of the stick- their normal food sources have been thinned and poisoned by others.
    Paul actually touched in that in a recent article too, but the problem there is when store-bought food is VERY expensive(a carton of milk can cost $15, for example) and often spoiled by the time it reaches there, for many Inuit the choice is essentially between mercury-poisoned seafood and no food at all. Raina can share some legit statistics about the high rate of food insecurity there.
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  3. #63
    I can I totally understand if people can't go vegetarian or vegan because they're allergic to soy because the only reason I've been able to transition to a vegetarian diet is because soy really agrees with me. I thought in the past that I was dependent on a bit of chicken for protein, but I now can get protein from soy milk, which I put on my cereal, in my coffee, I make Carnation Instant Breakfast with it, and I get a soy protein booster in Jamba Juice. I'm very dependent on soy as a vegetarian source of protein.
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  4. #64
    You can make tofu so many different ways too ;0
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  5. #65
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    there's no verdict yet actually on whether or not the Inuit diet (that contains higher level of mercury than normal) is effecting them in one way or another. Important to remember the spread of mercury is much more recent development, and previous studies of older generations put them at better health than most people due to their diet. There was a study in 2000 that actually showed that by dietary standards Inuit were one of the healthiest people on earth.

    http://discovermagazine.com/2004/oct/inuit-paradox

    the study notes that wild animal fats are incredibly different than the fats of farmed animals. (which side bar here: I read a study that suggested I developed interstitial cystitis as a result of switching to farmed meat after living off wild meat for so long! only one single study, but an interesting thought)

    Many studies suggest that because they eat wild and the fats are different and processed differently, they don't end up with the main illnesses like heart disease that kills us all down south https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inuit_diet

    Inuit actually consume more carbohydrates than most nutritionists have assumed.[14] Because Inuit frequently eat their meat raw and fresh, or freshly frozen, they can obtain more carbohydrates from their meat, as dietary glycogen, than Westerners can.[14][15] The Inuit practice of preserving a whole seal or bird carcass under an intact whole skin with a thick layer of blubber also permits some proteins to ferment, or hydrolyze, into carbohydrates.[14] Furthermore, the blubber, organs, muscle and skin of the marine mammals that the Inuit ate have significant glycogen stores which assist those animals when oxygen is depleted on prolonged dives.[16][17][18] For instance, when blubber is analyzed by direct carbohydrate measurements, it has been shown to contain as much as 8—30% carbohydrates.[17] While postmortem glycogen levels are often depleted through the onset of rigor mortis, marine mammals have a much delayed onset of rigor mortis, even in warm conditions, presumably due to the high content of oxymyoglobin in the muscle that may permit aerobic metabolism to continue slowly for some time after the death of the animal.[17][19] Additionally, in cold conditions, glycogen's depletion is halted at -18 C (-0.4 F) and lower temperatures in comminuted meat.[20][21]
    Traditional Inuit diets derive approximately 50% of their calories from fat, 30-35% from protein and 15-20% of their calories from carbohydrates, largely in the form of glycogen from the raw meat they consumed.[22] This high fat content provides valuable energy and prevents protein poisoning, which historically was sometimes a problem in late winter when game animals grew lean through winter starvation. It has been suggested that because the fats of the Inuit's wild-caught game are largely monounsaturated and rich in omega-3 fatty acids, the diet does not pose the same health risks as a typical Western high-fat diet.[23] However, evidence has shown that Inuit have a similar prevalence of coronary artery disease as non-Inuit populations and they have excessive mortality due to cerebrovascular strokes.[24][25]
    Vitamins and minerals which are typically derived from plant sources are nonetheless present in most Inuit diets. Vitamins A and D are present in the oils and livers of cold-water fishes and mammals. Vitamin C is obtained through sources such as caribou liver, kelp, whale skin, and seal brain; because these foods are typically eaten raw or frozen, the vitamin C they contain, which would be destroyed by cooking, is instead preserved.[26]

    Other interesting articles on the topic:

    http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.ca...om-arctic.html

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8871682

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Princess Kae-Leah View Post
    I can I totally understand if people can't go vegetarian or vegan because they're allergic to soy because the only reason I've been able to transition to a vegetarian diet is because soy really agrees with me. I thought in the past that I was dependent on a bit of chicken for protein, but I now can get protein from soy milk, which I put on my cereal, in my coffee, I make Carnation Instant Breakfast with it, and I get a soy protein booster in Jamba Juice. I'm very dependent on soy as a vegetarian source of protein.
    I think that is a huge misconception about soy being some kind of requirement though- plenty of vegans and vegetarians do not use soy at all. Totally possible not to, whether because it's an allergy or a choice for other reasons, or perhaps you just don't like it. I could seriously live without it, we rarely use soy products in our home. I do like tofu scramble but I just don't use it for anything else personally. I don't use any isolated soy proteins myself because the process by which the protein is isolated causes me to be allergic to it - the same goes for isolated pea protein and rice. But it's not a problem, as I'm not really all that into convenience foods, and get plenty of protein from tons of other sources. I prefer whole, unprocessed foods, anyway.

    So, the idea that people can't go vegetarian or vegan because of soy doesn't really hold water and too many make the choice for that reason because they're misinformed, often due to older information that's still out there.That said, soy a heck of a handy complete protein with all the amino acids.

    There is such an assumption about soy being part and parcel of being veg that you can find tons of articles and blog entries on how easy it is to live without it.

  7. #67
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    I can't eat any meat alternatives or many of the veggies and legumes used to create complete protiens or complete amino acids.

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by AniaR View Post
    I can't eat any meat alternatives or many of the veggies and legumes used to create complete protiens or complete amino acids.
    In your case, I have no issue with you not being veg*an as you're pretty much out of luck when it comes to your food allergies and other health problems preventing you from eating the available alternatives. Yes it's possible to be veg*an without soy but VERY difficult, as soy is pretty much the backbone of most meat alternatives, it's not just soy milk. I don't eat much legumes myself, but I eat a lot of stuff like ramen(McDougall's vegan instant ramen is pretty expensive, but a great alternative to the highly processed cheap ramen which often contain trace amounts of chicken and/or seafood) and fried rice which include small vegetables such as peas and corn so it isn't just pure carbs. I also take a synthetic multivitamin every day, which I know not everyone can process well. A vegetarian/vegan diet does require some planning and knowledge of nutrition to do right, and even I don't claim my diet is 100% ideal as I still might not get enough protein and eat too many carbs.
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  9. #69
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    yeah I also can't take any multivitamins or synthetic vitamins (which all B vitamins are!) haha so I am so out of luck. til they find a cure for my illnesses!

  10. #70
    I think the eco-quiz I shared about how animal-friendly one is is an example of not being too militant, as one doesn't have to be 100% vegetarian or vegan to score well, they just need to limit their animal product consumption.
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  11. #71
    I think I'm considered fairly extreme in my animal rights and environmental views compared to most folks here, but even I read Alicia Silverstone's blog sometimes and think "she can live that way?". She avoids plastics, processed food, and more to the extent that it seems downright impractical and cut off from mainstream society. It's like she never buys a mainstream brand of anything. She won't let her son play with plastic toys, even used ones from thrift stores, and her brand of veganism is closer to macrobiotics, with just about any kind of processed food shunned. If that's how she wants to live, good for her, but it doesn't strike me as a very easy or practical lifestyle to promote to the masses.
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  12. #72
    Senior Member Euro Pod Echidna's Avatar
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    Well, plastics- especially those for children's toys- are full of plasticides and toxins, so I find it very understandable if people wish to avoid that, completely unrelated to how it's made from fossil fuels.

  13. #73
    Odd though considering her computer was probably made from things that contribute to her carbon footprint. But I mean
    the whole point is to reduce your carbon footprint and watch what you buy to alleviate the shit going on with the environment. If she can do all of that clearly it's doable. Difficult, but doable.
    i don't have the capacity to do all of that. :|
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  14. #74
    Senior Member Euro Pod Echidna's Avatar
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    I can do without most electric devices (in fact, my dream is still getting to some lonely island and living stone-age like ), but I haven't found a way to replace a computer/internet (I don't have a smartphone and probably won't ever get one) which is pretty much mandatory nowadays, especially if you work via the internet....yeah.

    Cooking stove and water heater is another hard one.

  15. #75
    Well if you're on an island and it's not below freezing I'm sure it's doable. Firepit, flat rock or a makeshift pot.
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  16. #76
    I think a great book about plastics is Plastic: A Toxic Love Story by Susan Frienkel. It's very well-researched and interesting, detailing both the environmental and toxicity issues with plastics while at the same time showing how at times plastics can be useful for certain things.
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  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Echidna View Post
    I can do without most electric devices (in fact, my dream is still getting to some lonely island and living stone-age like ), but I haven't found a way to replace a computer/internet
    That is what satellites are for!
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  18. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by Echidna View Post
    Well, plastics- especially those for children's toys- are full of plasticides and toxins, so I find it very understandable if people wish to avoid that, completely unrelated to how it's made from fossil fuels.
    Well Alicia did inspire me, as a Toys For Tots volunteer to do more research about the companies whose toys I buy to donate and the potential toxins in plastic toys. What I found was very much a mixed bag to be sure. The Washington Toxics Coalition did a report called "Not So Squeaky Clean" in 2007 testing various toys for phthalates. All Mattel toys tested, as well as a Gotz doll made in Europe, were found phthalate-free, but several squeaky bath toys and a couple cheap baby dolls contained high amounts of phthalates. Apparently the European Union has stricter regulations than the US about toxins in plastic toys so European companies are usually the safest bet. The report stated that because Mattel does a lot of exporting to Europe, they generally obey the EU regulations.
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  19. #79
    http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/where-...-seal-hunting/

    Greenpeace shows a good example of intersectionality with a very level-headed stance on the seal issue.

    "Greenpeace is completely against the commercial hunting of seals for profit. We always will be. But the large-scale, commercial hunt is a world away from the traditional practices of Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic. In fact, Indigenous communities have shown time and again that they understand how to protect the Arctic ecosystem they call home, and their hunting practices have never been a threat to seal or whale populations. They do not hunt seal pups, and their hunt is conducted with respect for the animal. They hunt because it is a crucial way to sustain themselves and their families in the harsh Arctic environment. We respect their right to continue this tradition. Ive visited many communities in the Arctic over the last decade and have seen both how Indigenous Peoples conduct the hunt and how extremely important it is for them. It is not just a matter of culture, it is a matter of survival. Many Indigenous communities in the far north rely on seal products for food, warmth and clothing. They sell some of these products so they can sustain their livelihoods and keep their families alive through the harsh Arctic winter. On the other hand, the Canadian Government continues to allow the killing of upwards of half a million seal pups a year. This Government has a long history of sacrificing the health of our oceans for the short-term interests of the fishing and sealing industry. This is why we started our sealing campaign in the 1970s and why we still oppose the commercial hunt. But when Greenpeace and others campaigned against the seal hunt in the 1970s and 1980s, we didnt adequately distinguish between the inhumane and cruel industrial hunt and the traditional one. The results were devastating to many Arctic Indigenous communities. Hunting and fishing in this harsh landscape is, for many, their only means of survival"

    As to be expected, Paul Watson of Sea Shepherd shared his two cents on Greenpeace's updated stance-
    http://www.seashepherd.org/commentar...g-industry-752

    "Greenpeace has now crossed the line with their endorsement of seal fur as "sustainable." I initiated and led the first Greenpeace campaigns against sealing from 1975 until 1977. I really never thought I would see the day when Greenpeace would sell out to the sealing industry. Jon Burgwald speaking for Greenpeace has announced that Greenpeace supports "sustainable" sealing. There is no such thing. Seals are threatened by rapidly diminishing fish populations and pollution. Our Ocean is dying and Greenpeace seems to be in abject denial of this reality. We need seals to help maintain a healthy marine eco-system. Greenpeace is now playing into the hands of the fur industry and the Canadian interest in marketing seal fur to China. The organization is now giving comfort to the seal butchers in supporting one of the most brutal and bloody mass massacres of wildlife on the planet. Greenpeace does not oppose the slaughter of pilot whales in the Faroes or the brutal massacre of dolphins in Taiji, Japan and now this. How long before Greenpeace endorses the illegal whaling operations by Japan which they still raise funds for campaigns that they never actually do? The last time a Greenpeace ship sailed to the Southern Ocean to defend whales was 2007 yet the money begging mail-outs continue to be churned out asking for donations to save the whales. We risked our lives to save seals from the clubs of the sealers. I was personally beaten by sealers and jailed for intervening against the seal slaughter. I was dragged through icy waters and across a blood soaked deck through a gauntlet of sealers on a sealing ship in 1977. They kicked and hit me with their clubs, spit on me and pushed my face into the blood and the gore and Greenpeace exploited those images to raise funds at the time and now they dismiss that sacrifice and the hard work and dangerous risks taken by Greenpeacers back then without even the courtesy of an apology to us who carried their banner. And now Greenpeace refers to seal fur as eco-friendly. What next, an endorsement for Monsanto? These people calling themselves Greenpeace today never took any risks for the seals, were never arrested, they have never even been to the ice floes to see the brutality with their own eyes."

    I feel like Greenpeace's stance has been taken out of context as they made it very clear that they do not support the large-scale annual seal cull.

    Paul ends his statement above with his link :
    http://www.msnbc.com/msnbc-news/watc...n-549602883956

    I didn't watch the whole video, but I do sorta agree with him that promoting the sale and wear of fur is not something I can in good conscience get behind, and the title/headline of that video does give the impression of promoting seal fur in general, BUT I don't think Greenpeace's stance is really "yay seal fur" as much as trying to be sensitive to the harsh reality of life way up north.
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  20. #80
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    Ugh I can't stand Paul. I asked him about this personally and got a very racist reply.

    Yay for Greenpeace. They have nothing to gain by supporting Inuit. How is it a sellout. I challenge Paul to go live in Nunavut with only access to what the inuit have.

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