Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 53 of 53

Thread: Denver Aquarium Mermaids

  1. #41
    Ah thank you. That's good to know! Do you also feel that it's because they are looking for a specific look?

  2. #42
    Senior Member Undisclosed Pod
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    14,215
    No, it's because they don't pay very well and most aquariums don't really respect or want mermaids lol. They do it as a draw to bring people in, and typically hire existing aquarium staff so they can pay them less. A friend of mine works there and works there as a person and a mermaid and I think she's fairly diverse looking.

    But this is fairly standard across most aquariums. some don't pay at all (Last I heard Ripley's stopped paying mers but allows you to use their logos for "exposure") and more often than not if you see a mer in an aquarium, they've PAID to do it. There's a few threads on this.

    It doesn't hurt to try, it's just not the prestigious thing everyone thinks it is. The mers I know who work in aquariums are some top notch women tho I will say that!

  3. #43
    I'm glad that's the reason, and not only aesthetic reasons! Does your friend feel the aquarium does a good job taking care of the animals? That is what I truly care about, and I like that their show is aimed to teach children to keep the ocean clean. If I ever got the opportunity I would want to continue that into meet and greets. I even offered to volunteer! It really would be to teach kids and be around the animals and get to swim. I appreciate the encouragement, maybe after some practice (and some weight loss!) I will give it a try.

  4. #44
    Senior Member Undisclosed Pod
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    14,215
    it sounds like your heart is in the right place and you'd be a good fit, it's just that dozens and dozens of mermaids come to them for the same thing!

  5. #45
    Yeah. :/ You're right.

  6. #46
    I asked them once in person the requirements for hiring and was told this by the trainer.

    You have to have a free diving license.
    You have to be the right size to fit in their tails (which are now MerNation tails).
    You cannot have any tattoos.

    There might be more requirements, and that was about four years ago, but that's what I was told. I was out because I have tattoos and the freediving license is expensive.

    Sent from my F8331 using Tapatalk
    Owner/Operator behind Tails & Portholes
    Store Blog
    - Personal Blog - Twitter - Instagram - Store Facebook
    This treasure cums for YOUR booty

  7. #47
    Senior Member Undisclosed Pod
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    14,215
    many aquariums want scuba too

  8. #48
    Thank you - that's good to know! I wonder if they will allow the use of your own tail if it has never been used before (so you don't have to worry about cross-contamination with the aquarium). I also noticed that the mermaids do not wear makeup - I think that would add a lot, especially to dry mermaids that meet people, but I am sure there are concerns there too. Animals first!

    I was just looking into getting scuba/freediver certified - it's something my husband and I both want to do and there's no time like the present!

    Does anyone else have any experience/insight? What is it like behind the scenes of the aquarium? Are the animals properly cared for?
    Last edited by MerPizza; 06-21-2018 at 12:01 PM.

  9. #49
    With aquariums there is a large concern on safety to meet federal OSHA standards and aquatic life husbandry rules. Pre-screening for potential work is often tied to that. As an example, some aquariums require a full blood panel, physical, and eyesight test plus medical release plus First Aid / CPR certification plus SCUBA certification plus training from the animal or dive staff on decontamination procedures plus proof of worker's comp and general liability insurance coverage. Others just care about decontamination and SCUBA certifications. SCUBA certifications are more commonly required than freediving certifications as they more closely match the aquarium staff's own requirements.

    Aquarium environments are closed systems where infection and disease are a significant risk. As a result, it's fairly standard for aquariums to NOT allow in outside SCUBA, freediving, or mermaid costumes in to their spaces as they cannot readily prove that they are clean and not carrying things like invasive species or disease. When they do allow them then there is normally an extended bleach soak and decontamination procedure in place. In general, full silicone tails are easier to get approved as compared to anything with sewn sequins or resin style scales, having neoprene, or any other kind of fiber material that may carry unwanted things or be eaten by fish on accident.

    Aquariums, in general, struggle for money and need most of what they bring in to pay for the animals' food (sometimes semi truckloads of it per day at fine restaurant level inspection ratings) and to keep the large life support systems running. As a result they rely heavily on low paid and volunteer labor as they need to take care of the animals first. If you're looking to make money then aquariums are NOT the place to look for it.
    Sheroes Entertainment LLC
    Visit us at:
    www.sheroesentertainment.com
    Follow us on Instagram at: @mermaids_sheroes_entertainment
    Like us on Facebook at:
    https://www.facebook.com/SheroesEntertainment

    Hollywood's underwater stunt performance team - stunning professional mermaids and lifeguards available internationally.
    >The Home of LA Mermaid School<

  10. #50
    Hi Sheroes! Thank you SO MUCH for getting back to me! I am extremely happy to hear about the aquarium requirements that keep the animals safe; that's the top priority! I'm glad to hear most of the money goes to feeding and caring for the animals. Our aquarium even has a sloth and tigers! Just feeding the tigers themselves has to be super expensive. Luckily I am hoping to volunteer. I really want to teach conservation and feel I can interact with guests better than the mermaid I met there. (That sounds rude. I don't mean it to be, I just expect the mermaids to be engaging). Anywhoooo, at least I have peace of mind and goals to work towards.

  11. #51
    Senior Member Undisclosed Pod PearlieMae's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    6,625
    Follow PearlieMae On Twitter Add PearlieMae on Facebook
    Quote Originally Posted by SheroesEntertainment View Post
    With aquariums there is a large concern on safety to meet federal OSHA standards and aquatic life husbandry rules. Pre-screening for potential work is often tied to that. As an example, some aquariums require a full blood panel, physical, and eyesight test plus medical release plus First Aid / CPR certification plus SCUBA certification plus training from the animal or dive staff on decontamination procedures plus proof of worker's comp and general liability insurance coverage. Others just care about decontamination and SCUBA certifications. SCUBA certifications are more commonly required than freediving certifications as they more closely match the aquarium staff's own requirements.

    Aquarium environments are closed systems where infection and disease are a significant risk. As a result, it's fairly standard for aquariums to NOT allow in outside SCUBA, freediving, or mermaid costumes in to their spaces as they cannot readily prove that they are clean and not carrying things like invasive species or disease. When they do allow them then there is normally an extended bleach soak and decontamination procedure in place. In general, full silicone tails are easier to get approved as compared to anything with sewn sequins or resin style scales, having neoprene, or any other kind of fiber material that may carry unwanted things or be eaten by fish on accident.

    Aquariums, in general, struggle for money and need most of what they bring in to pay for the animals' food (sometimes semi truckloads of it per day at fine restaurant level inspection ratings) and to keep the large life support systems running. As a result they rely heavily on low paid and volunteer labor as they need to take care of the animals first. If you're looking to make money then aquariums are NOT the place to look for it.
    This is great information! I hope you share it across many social media platforms!

    (I would be happy to, with full credit to you.)

  12. #52
    Sure, you are welcome to share the information about OSHA standards etc. Thank you for asking!
    Sheroes Entertainment LLC
    Visit us at:
    www.sheroesentertainment.com
    Follow us on Instagram at: @mermaids_sheroes_entertainment
    Like us on Facebook at:
    https://www.facebook.com/SheroesEntertainment

    Hollywood's underwater stunt performance team - stunning professional mermaids and lifeguards available internationally.
    >The Home of LA Mermaid School<

  13. #53
    @MerPizza - you are very welcome! Any volunteer role at an aquarium can make a huge impact. You are absolutely right that feeding tigers is expensive! That's why donations and volunteer docents, educators, etc. are so incredibly valuable to aquariums. They help to keep the money focused on the animal care and enrichment. If you want to volunteer then see if you can be assigned to the education department - it sounds like with your interest in teaching about conservation it might be an awesome place to learn content, pick up some new teaching skills insights, and find inspiration in how you can make content more fun for kids.
    Sheroes Entertainment LLC
    Visit us at:
    www.sheroesentertainment.com
    Follow us on Instagram at: @mermaids_sheroes_entertainment
    Like us on Facebook at:
    https://www.facebook.com/SheroesEntertainment

    Hollywood's underwater stunt performance team - stunning professional mermaids and lifeguards available internationally.
    >The Home of LA Mermaid School<

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •