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Thread: monofin =/= swimming aid

  1. #1

    monofin =/= swimming aid

    Hey guys, I just want to stress it even more, coz I see many times written in discussions this way: 'yeah u can swim here and there if ur monofin is strong enough' things like this, and there are lots of new people getting into mermaiding, jumping directly into deep water ( literally and/or theoretically ) and I just want to say:

    MONOFINS ARE NOT SWIMMING AIDS.

    One need no(t just) strong monofin in a wild open water (or anywhere), but a STORNG SWIMMING SKILL first (and a buddy of course). Monofin's original purpose is to make skilled swimmers even faster, it just 'happens' that the movement required and the look it has is desired for mermaiding.

    So please please: first be a confident swimmer THEN practice with monofin (after get ur dream tail )

    ( ps: I know it was already topic many times, but I see lots of concerning comments recently, just wanted to underline it <3 *plunges back into silence*)

  2. #2
    Thank you for this, I once got really annoyed when a lifeguard likened a monofin to one of those float board things, generalising it as a 'swimming aid.' Nope. Floats assist beginner swimmers by helping them stay above the water. Monofins are for confident swimmers, and there are risks with using them.
    Last edited by Glinda Rose; 05-08-2017 at 11:14 AM.
    Glinda Rose
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Undisclosed Pod
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    I think the problem comes from them being marketed as such. They aren't as bad as they were before, since there's been so much controversy. I will say though some people like me are terrible swimmers without fins. If I had to pass a swim test to use a monofin, I'd fail. I can doggy paddle, and not go very far, and I am so floaty that dolphin kick is pointless. But for me using a fin totally changed the dynamic of how my body moves, and in my case... makes me a million times better hahaha.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Pod of The South Slim's Avatar
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    I am exactly the same way except for the floaty. With me being all bones; I have no buoyancy so I'll sink. Oddly enough the floaty feel of the fin fun monofin really balance me out in that regards underwater.

    Quote Originally Posted by AniaR View Post
    I think the problem comes from them being marketed as such. They aren't as bad as they were before, since there's been so much controversy. I will say though some people like me are terrible swimmers without fins. If I had to pass a swim test to use a monofin, I'd fail. I can doggy paddle, and not go very far, and I am so floaty that dolphin kick is pointless. But for me using a fin totally changed the dynamic of how my body moves, and in my case... makes me a million times better hahaha.
    When you make the impossible become possible, that when the magic happens!
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  5. #5
    Moderator Pod of Cali Mermaid Wesley's Avatar
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by AniaR View Post
    I think the problem comes from them being marketed as such. They aren't as bad as they were before, since there's been so much controversy. I will say though some people like me are terrible swimmers without fins. If I had to pass a swim test to use a monofin, I'd fail. I can doggy paddle, and not go very far, and I am so floaty that dolphin kick is pointless. But for me using a fin totally changed the dynamic of how my body moves, and in my case... makes me a million times better hahaha.
    I'm so glad I'm not alone there!
    I can't do much more than breaststroke without fins on.

    For anyone just starting out, I would recommend getting used to dolphin kick with a set of the little training fins (bi fins) It's surprising just how much propulsion they can give you and you can still separate your feet if you need to.


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  7. #7
    Hehe, Raina, Slim and LouLouBelle, you might not have excellent technik then, but atleast are CONFIDENT in the water. I just got anxious myself when I read advice for someone just starting to swim, like ' just get the stronger monofin and u will be fine ', even pro freediving monofins stiffness is calculated to the swimmer weight/height/strenght, not for how easily they want to swim with

    yep, bifins are useful when I've been finswimmer (sounds cool now but actually was very bad at competing XDD ) my coach didn't gave me a monofin (even to try) for 2 years. Of course there is difference when the goal is to achieve perfect technik in favor of speed nah but you guys got what I meant by starting this thread

    About kids monofins, I recently found a hungarian (or at least was automaic translation I dont remember) selling them and was nicely, lenghtly explained how is not an aid

    ,\n/ <3

  8. #8
    I think a good way to find out if you're ready for a monofin is to be able to perform the way you'd like to underwater without ANY fins. The ability to maneuver and swim freely without any assistance is the first step towards your goal. Swim fins are training devices--they are used not to make a swimmer move faster, but to make their legs work harder by pushing more water. In the same way one can wear stockings in the water or wear a parachute to increase drag and make a swimmer work harder, fins are designed to STRENGTHEN swimming--not to instantly make a poor swimmer suddenly an adept mermaid swimmer. Mermaids should aim to use training swim fins first and become confident, THEN move on to monofins. LAST comes adding the tail. Training with stockings and a monofin is a good trial before adding a full tail skin.

    People who have never before worked with basic swim fins or a bare monofin should NOT put on a tail and hop in the water expecting to magically swim well. Swimming takes practice, just as running or doing gymnastics does.

    Here is a video of my friend and I swimming without any fins, we've been competitive swimmers for about 12 years when this video was taken:

    Last edited by MermaidAiera; 06-18-2017 at 06:42 PM. Reason: Add video

  9. #9
    Senior Member Euro Pod Echidna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MermaidAiera View Post
    I think a good way to find out if you're ready for a monofin is to be able to perform the way you'd like to underwater without ANY fins. The ability to maneuver and swim freely without any assistance is the first step towards your goal.
    while this is the ideal case, as others have already pointed out, the dolphin kick is HARDER to do without fins than with a monofin, as it takes a lot of strength and special muscles.
    A monofin can thus help swimmers new to dolphinstyle* to work up toward being able to do it without any fins.
    People who are very buoyant have it extra hard.

    I'm quite fast and comfortable dolphinkicking entire laps without any fins now, but when I started out, I couldn't do it without a fin, I'd just float up and move inch-wise, haha.


    *obviously you should be at home in the water regardless.

  10. #10
    I guess I was just never in the position to call myself a beginner when it comes to tails By the time I got into the mermaid scene, I had already been through years of training and was just ready to dive in. You should see some of the old videos I have of me swimming though--I started out like a drowning cat just like most people XD

    Either way, everyone is different. Butterfly is the hardest stroke because it does use a lot of muscles and skill to undulate properly, so whatever each person needs to do to uniquely strengthen them is really up to them. I feel like using a kickboard is a great way to try out using monofins; while it isn't a lifesaving device, it can help steady new swimmers while they try out the new motions and work underdeveloped muscles.

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