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Thread: Getting Around at Con in a Silicone Tail

  1. #1

    Getting Around at Con in a Silicone Tail

    Greetings everyone!

    Not sure if it's been asked before, but does anyone have a creative way to get around at con when they're legs have fully transformed into their glorious fins?? I'm afraid to use a wheelchair, because I'm SUPER tall and my fluke will certainly drag the floor

    I thought about one of those tall tool carts, but a few of my friends think if I move, it'll just tip over!

    So any creative ideas out there? Maybe something I don't know about that sits high, but not too high? Or plans for something you've made?

    Anything will help at this point- I have a few more months before con, and my tail is actually done.

    Thank for the advice! <3

  2. #2
    They make low carts that could work for you. Most of them are only 8-10 inches off the ground with the wheels spread fairly far apart. Plus it should be stable enough to decorate a bit. I feel bad to suggest harbor freight tools but they might have something that could work. Another option is to buy some lumber and some castor wheels and custom build a mermaid transporter.

  3. #3
    Senior Member North Pacific Pod Arking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cletusk20 View Post
    They make low carts that could work for you. Most of them are only 8-10 inches off the ground with the wheels spread fairly far apart. Plus it should be stable enough to decorate a bit. I feel bad to suggest harbor freight tools but they might have something that could work. Another option is to buy some lumber and some castor wheels and custom build a mermaid transporter.
    There's another thread on here that does just that! It was pretty neat as the mermaid kind of sculpted a sort of rocky outcropping onto it.

    As far as wheelchairs go, I know more and more they are frowned upon. I know Bette Midler uses one for her shows when she does her Mermaid skit, but Lady Gaga got a lot of flack when she pulled the same routine from both Advocacy groups and those whom felt she was copying.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Pod of The South Keiris's Avatar
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    A friend of mine, Electra, impersonates Bette in some of her shows and constructed an elaborate bathtub complete with bubbles and the tail hanging over the edge so she could advertise the shows up and down the street in P-Town. She just rolled herself wherever she needed to go in full mermaid Bette gear and it looked awesome!

  5. #5
    Thank you for all of the responses!! I thought of something crazy to do, and have ordered the parts to put it together! I cannot wait to post it!! Or go to con for that matter I'm going with something along the lines of cletusk20's suggestion. Time to get the power tools out again!

  6. #6
    Another thought came to me @YukiJoy, & I thought I would put it here for future reference.

    Here in Toronto they have these little electric carts with a seat that they call mobility scooters.
    Name:  scout_dst_4_wheel_mobility_scooter_with_suspension.jpg
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    I've seen used ones on Kijiji for <$200, and they're super cheap if they have worn out batteries and/or ruined seats.

    My idea would be to get one with a wrecked seat and replace the seat with a "rock" you can sit on that is moved back somewhat from the original seat position so you have more room for your flukes, while maybe modding it so one or more batteries are mounted in front of the steering column, so there will still be weight on the steering wheels with you sitting further back.

    The basket would be a handy storage place for your comb and shells and would be a great way to carry your con loot.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by AptaMer View Post
    Another thought came to me @YukiJoy, & I thought I would put it here for future reference.

    Here in Toronto they have these little electric carts with a seat that they call mobility scooters.
    Name:  scout_dst_4_wheel_mobility_scooter_with_suspension.jpg
Views: 310
Size:  19.1 KB
    I've seen used ones on Kijiji for <$200, and they're super cheap if they have worn out batteries and/or ruined seats.

    My idea would be to get one with a wrecked seat and replace the seat with a "rock" you can sit on that is moved back somewhat from the original seat position so you have more room for your flukes, while maybe modding it so one or more batteries are mounted in front of the steering column, so there will still be weight on the steering wheels with you sitting further back.

    The basket would be a handy storage place for your comb and shells and would be a great way to carry your con loot.
    That's a neat idea!

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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Keiris View Post
    A friend of mine, Electra, impersonates Bette in some of her shows and constructed an elaborate bathtub complete with bubbles and the tail hanging over the edge so she could advertise the shows up and down the street in P-Town. She just rolled herself wherever she needed to go in full mermaid Bette gear and it looked awesome!
    Woah! Are there any pictures? That sounds awesome

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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Arking View Post
    As far as wheelchairs go, I know more and more they are frowned upon. I know Bette Midler uses one for her shows when she does her Mermaid skit, but Lady Gaga got a lot of flack when she pulled the same routine from both Advocacy groups and those whom felt she was copying.
    I don't know why this is an issue. I can see it if somebody was using their wheelchair to get special privileges that are legitimately reserved for disabled people (parking, seating near the front, etc.), but wheelchairs themselves are tools specifically for getting around when you can't walk. I own one simply for the amount of times I've injured my feet, or the time I needed surgery on my feet. Being unable to walk isn't a culture, and for many people it's not a permanent problem. It's nobody's business if I decide to use my personal wheelchair that I paid for taking up space in my closet when I need to get around land in my tail.

    There is the issue of running over your fluke if it's large, but that's not going to be a problem with every tail.
    bluecorvidae.deviantart.com

  10. #10
    My friend uses these.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCorvidae View Post
    I don't know why this is an issue. I can see it if somebody was using their wheelchair to get special privileges that are legitimately reserved for disabled people (parking, seating near the front, etc.), but wheelchairs themselves are tools specifically for getting around when you can't walk. I own one simply for the amount of times I've injured my feet, or the time I needed surgery on my feet. Being unable to walk isn't a culture, and for many people it's not a permanent problem. It's nobody's business if I decide to use my personal wheelchair that I paid for taking up space in my closet when I need to get around land in my tail.

    There is the issue of running over your fluke if it's large, but that's not going to be a problem with every tail.
    I have to respectfully disagree with the highlighted part of this post.
    For people who are physically or mentally disabled, their disability is part of their culture. For examples of Disability Culture (yes, that is an actual term), I would highly recommend you watch the documentary "Sound and Fury", and also go check out the Disability Visibility Project to learn more.

    I hope it doesn't sound like I am attacking you, but I would really like to be able to help others understand that this is an issue that needs more visibility and sensitivity.

    Personal PSA: I am not currently physically disabled, but I do work as a caregiver in an elderly care facility where a good portion of my residents have been disabled for most of their lives. I also have a late uncle who was wheelchair or bedbound for 20 years following an accident at age 15. I've been at the edge of this culture most of my life.


    -----



    Overall, I like the idea of L-carts for getting around in tails. (like the one KT posted above) They are less likely to run over a tail as you have more space to fully support a fluke, and also can support an actual chair (think plastic lawn chair) if you wanted to bolt one to it. They're much easier to decorate, too.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by ChelseaSelkie View Post
    I have to respectfully disagree with the highlighted part of this post.
    For people who are physically or mentally disabled, their disability is part of their culture. For examples of Disability Culture (yes, that is an actual term), I would highly recommend you watch the documentary "Sound and Fury", and also go check out the Disability Visibility Project to learn more.

    I hope it doesn't sound like I am attacking you, but I would really like to be able to help others understand that this is an issue that needs more visibility and sensitivity.

    Personal PSA: I am not currently physically disabled, but I do work as a caregiver in an elderly care facility where a good portion of my residents have been disabled for most of their lives. I also have a late uncle who was wheelchair or bedbound for 20 years following an accident at age 15. I've been at the edge of this culture most of my life.


    -----



    Overall, I like the idea of L-carts for getting around in tails. (like the one KT posted above) They are less likely to run over a tail as you have more space to fully support a fluke, and also can support an actual chair (think plastic lawn chair) if you wanted to bolt one to it. They're much easier to decorate, too.
    While that's a fair point, I still feel that wheel chairs are first and foremost tools, and not something that can be appropriated. It's insensitive to take a public wheelchair in a public space when you don't need one. It's not insensitive to use your own personal wheelchair on an occasion when you cannot walk, even if you are not otherwise disabled.
    bluecorvidae.deviantart.com

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCorvidae View Post
    While that's a fair point, I still feel that wheel chairs are first and foremost tools, and not something that can be appropriated. It's insensitive to take a public wheelchair in a public space when you don't need one. It's not insensitive to use your own personal wheelchair on an occasion when you cannot walk, even if you are not otherwise disabled.
    It may not be your opinion, however the wheelchair has already been appropriated and your using it without a visible disability will be viewed by the majority of the population as being in quite poor taste. That's just how culture works.

    I guess an option would be to make it very apparent that it is YOUR wheelchair with lots and lots of decoration, but for some it isn't going to make a difference.

  14. #14
    I think modifying a wheel chair with a custom made fluke suport would be awesome but some form of motorized cart would be awesome to thow!


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  15. #15
    The thing is about wheelchairs, the reason for them is that you can’t walk long distances or for a long amount of time. My sister needed a wheelchair after she got surgery.


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  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by ChelseaSelkie View Post
    It may not be your opinion, however the wheelchair has already been appropriated and your using it without a visible disability will be viewed by the majority of the population as being in quite poor taste. That's just how culture works.

    I guess an option would be to make it very apparent that it is YOUR wheelchair with lots and lots of decoration, but for some it isn't going to make a difference.
    I'd like a source for the highlighted bit. People are more reasonable than you give them credit for. For every person who would be rude enough to stick their nose in my business and chastise me for using a wheelchair while in a costume, there would be fifty more that would go "cool, a mermaid" and thousands that just won't care.

    As far as people who would have a problem regardless, I'm unbothered by it. Their feelings don't negate the facts that
    a) It IS mine, whether they realize it or not
    b) I have legitimately needed it in the past, and may need it again in the future.

    But if anyone wants to argue ethics, I'd like to point out that asking anyone to prove that they need their wheelchair is a violation of their privacy regarding their medical history.
    bluecorvidae.deviantart.com

  17. #17
    It is pretty easy to find information on this in the time of year we are in!
    "Disability is not a Halloween costume." is a phrase often used that comes to mind. I have seen a few articles with that title as well, or some variation of it. I mean, even the issue of people thinking "haunted asylums" are a fun way to stage a halloween night of fun is troubling this time of year. "Ghosts are Scary, Disabled People are Not: The Troubling Rise of the Haunted Asylum" is one article about that... there are lots of opinion columns to sift through, if you can get past all the DIY articles of "How to dress for Halloween if you're disabled!"
    But I guess that using a wheelchair as a prop being offensive also negates my idea of dressing the wheelchair up to look like it fits in, if the person inside the wheelchair doesn't actually need it.

    People don't generally bother with ethics IRL. Not a lot of people understand HIPAA. They ask if something is wrong if they're brave enough, or if not then they will judge behind your back. When someone comes up and asks "Why are you using that wheelchair?" and you say that it is because you can't walk in your tail, how are you going to handle a look of disgust? Now you may be confident, but will you be that way in the moment? They aren't always going to know it is yours, and it is... rather difficult to say so without sounding rude.

    I guess this is less run into in the quiet cons we as a community have, since most mers are sympathetic to the difficulty it takes to get around "suited up", but out in large cons like comic conventions or similar there is a wider variety of people of varying abilities that could be quite disheartened by seeing this. Basically all I have tried to say throughout this is "Be careful, you're going to be judged, be prepped to handle it... or be resourceful and find a different mode of transport to avoid all of this" and, of course, the original point about disability being an actual culture.

  18. #18
    I know plenty of people who don’t care about that kind of stuff. Molly Burke is a blind youtube and she is like “Yes more blind jokes!” And I know plenty of wheelchair-bound people who are fine with it.


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  19. #19
    Anyone ever considered transforming something like this into a mermaid mobile !!! It’s some thing I’ve been thinking about for a while now!


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  20. #20
    That's pretty neat, but...you can't pedal?

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