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Thread: Mexico to Save the World's Rarest Marine Mammal

  1. #1
    Senior Member Chesapeake Pod Merman Dan's Avatar
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    Mexico to Save the World's Rarest Marine Mammal

    Great news!!

    "The Mexican Government is to implement sustainable fishing practices to reduce threats to the critically-endangered vaquita porpoise"... link

    (Formerly known as Æolius)

  2. #2
    Senior Member North Pacific Pod Miyu's Avatar
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    I'm so glad they're working to save the vaquita, they're such cute little porpoises! Thanks for sharing, Aeolius

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  3. #3
    Awesome! Thanks for sharing!
    “The cure for anything is salt water -- sweat, tears, or the sea.”
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    Senior Member Rocky Mountain Pod Mermaid Dottie's Avatar
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    I had no idea there was a marine animal so small 0.0 it's so CUTE!
    Thank you Mexico!
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  5. #5
    Poor little guys, they're so adorable!!!! .O~O.

  6. #6
    Awe! I can't help but giggle when I see them! I don't know why.... They are adorable though!
    Formerly known as "kimmie".

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  8. #8
    IT'S SOO ADORABLE!!!!!!!!
    Hugs, fishes, and mermaid kisses!

  9. #9
    The efforts are merely regulations which will help, but not enough. there are only around 30 individuals vaquitas left and illegal fishing and the demand for the totoaba is an increasing demand in foreign countries.
    There is a ban on the use of gillnets in the upper Gulf of Mexico now so that's good, but remember that illegal activity still happens. I hope the ban is fiercely enforced.
    Ill be talking a lot about vaquitas with the kids at my Fantasea; Ocean Discovery show. They really need to be discussed more.


    https://www.worldwildlife.org/storie...-marine-mammal
    http://www.vivavaquita.org/vaquita.html
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  10. #10
    Junior Member Chesapeake Pod Mermaid Ceto's Avatar
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    Another very interesting method was also planned. The bottlenose dolphins of the navy were going to be trained to seek out the remaining vaquitas, and then the vaquitas would be placed in a responsible captivity sight where they would breed and help increase the population. It's definitely a daring solution, as the vaquitas could not make it due to stress, but it could be their only hope. I'm glad that Mexico is finally giving its support to this endangered animal!Name:  FB_IMG_1500515495746.jpg
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    "It's not about what you know. It's about what you learn."

  11. #11
    I forgot about that. Such an interesting idea!
    the captivity thing is a concern. i know some species have been saved by being bred in captivity ( California condor) and others don't fare as well.
    I wish we knew more about the vaquita. They are so mysterious.
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  12. #12
    Junior Member Chesapeake Pod Mermaid Ceto's Avatar
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    Some animals do better in captivity than others. For example, the ragged tooth shark and zebra shark do very well in aquariums, but a great white hasn't been able to live in one for more than six months. Fortunately, other cetacean species have survived in captivity, so that might give some needed insight on how to care for them. I think that this is the safest method because they will be away from the threat of fishing nets, but the initial transfer could be dangerous.
    "It's not about what you know. It's about what you learn."

  13. #13
    Well, looks like the captivity plan was a bust. I didn't expect it to work out in the first place but I'm still disappointed. But I'm not giving up hope just yet. The fact that they were able to find vaquitas shows that they're still out there. What's more, it appears that they're getting better at avoiding nets.

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